kenobi-wan-obi:


Keyhole in The Clouds
This photo was taken as the rain clouds began to build. Just as the sun was to set, it shone perfectly through the cloud, creating the “keyhole to heaven”. The Angel reflection around the outside of the cloud/light formation made this photo very unique.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Keyhole in The Clouds

This photo was taken as the rain clouds began to build. Just as the sun was to set, it shone perfectly through the cloud, creating the “keyhole to heaven”. The Angel reflection around the outside of the cloud/light formation made this photo very unique.

❝ If you think of this idea of nothingness as mere blankness, and you hold onto this idea of blankness, you haven’t understood it. Nothingness is really like the nothingness of space, which contains the whole universe. All the sun, moon and stars, and the mountains and rivers, and the good men and bad men, and the animals and the insects, the whole bit—all are contained in the void. So out of this void comes everything and you are it. What else could you be? ❞

— Alan Watts, The State of Nothing (via sciencesoup)

kenobi-wan-obi:


Open Cluster Messier 45: Pleiades Closeup

This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic camera on the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona.
Image Credit: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Richard Cool (University of Arizona) and WIYN
The Pleiades are an open cluster easily visible to the naked eye. The cluster is dominated by several hot, luminous and massive stars.
The blue nebulosity surrounding the brightest stars are due to blue light from the stars scattering off of dust grains in the interstellar gas between us and the stars. The cluster is also known as the ‘Seven Sisters’. And in Japan it is called Subaru.
The image was generated with observations in the B (blue), V (green), and I (red) filters. In this image, North is right, East is up.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Open Cluster Messier 45: Pleiades Closeup

This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic camera on the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona.

Image Credit: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Richard Cool (University of Arizona) and WIYN

The Pleiades are an open cluster easily visible to the naked eye. The cluster is dominated by several hot, luminous and massive stars.

The blue nebulosity surrounding the brightest stars are due to blue light from the stars scattering off of dust grains in the interstellar gas between us and the stars. The cluster is also known as the ‘Seven Sisters’. And in Japan it is called Subaru.

The image was generated with observations in the B (blue), V (green), and I (red) filters. In this image, North is right, East is up.

awkwardsituationist:

"suns haste to set, that so remoter lights beckon the wanderer to his vaster home"
- ralph waldo emerson

photos by dave morrow in the american north pacific. (more photos of the milky way)